1. Famicom  With Games (Games pictured: Super Mario Bros., Challenger, Door Door, Gradius, Rainbow Islands, Transformers: Mystery of Convoy)

    One of the joys of collecting Famicom games over the U.S. versions are the variety of cartridge styles. In America, Nintendo made the cartridge a proprietary item which every company was required to use (this is why unlicensed games, like those made by Tengen or Color Dreams, used different carts). 

    But in Japan, third parties had greater autonomy, so they could choose different colors or even create their own cartridge style. Konami carts, for example, have more rigid edges and the label stretches to the top of the cart so you can see the title from above. 

    The small space allowed for imagery gave the FC carts a characteristic feel. It’s iconic enough that there’s an art show in Japan each year where designers have created new FC cartridge art for fake games - it’s pretty neat, actually

     

  2. fateese:

    theassortment:

    Family Computer & Games

    Inspired by fellow nostalgia blogger okamidensetsu, I’m taking a focus this week on some of the electronic citizens of my collection. 

    The Famicom (along with its North American counterpart, the NES) is my favorite game console, and represents what I think was a time in gaming that was near-perfect. Now some of that is definitely nostalgia speaking, but I also feel like the design philosophies that governed the industry at the time are often superior to modern philosophies. Titles were simple and colorful - the graphical limitations of the FC required this - and there was a huge variety of genres, many of which had their start on the console.

    It’s also got one of the largest libraries of games - more than 700, not including bootlegs - and hundreds of them are worth playing. Not to mention the fact that, in 20 or 30 years, all of them will still have exactly the same functionality as they did upon release. Compare that to Pokemon Black/White - probably my favorite in the series - and how its Wi-Fi capabilities were removed after less than five years. Will Halo 4 be as fun decades down the line when Microsoft pulls online support? 

    I could go on, and on, but I’ll leave it at that. Suffice it to say, I love the Famicom.

    The thing I always envied about the Famicom vs. the North American NES was that pair of controller holders on the sides.

    The controller holders are great! The only problem is that the controllers are hard-wired into the system and have very short cords, which means you either need to be right next to the FC or right next to the TV (or both).

    This also means that if you get an FC with shitty controllers, you’ve pretty much got gotta find a whole other FC to replace them!

     

  3. Family Computer & Games

    Inspired by fellow nostalgia blogger okamidensetsu, I’m taking a focus this week on some of the electronic citizens of my collection. 

    The Famicom (along with its North American counterpart, the NES) is my favorite game console, and represents what I think was a time in gaming that was near-perfect. Now some of that is definitely nostalgia speaking, but I also feel like the design philosophies that governed the industry at the time are often superior to modern philosophies. Titles were simple and colorful - the graphical limitations of the FC required this - and there was a huge variety of genres, many of which had their start on the console.

    It’s also got one of the largest libraries of games - more than 700, not including bootlegs - and hundreds of them are worth playing. Not to mention the fact that, in 20 or 30 years, all of them will still have exactly the same functionality as they did upon release. Compare that to Pokemon Black/White - probably my favorite in the series - and how its Wi-Fi capabilities were removed after less than five years. Will Halo 4 be as fun decades down the line when Microsoft pulls online support? 

    I could go on, and on, but I’ll leave it at that. Suffice it to say, I love the Famicom.

     

  4. COINCIDENCE? 

    (Probably.) 

    (Skids’ original alt-mode was a compact, but in Marvel it was misinterpreted as a van.)

     

  5. theassortment:

    In celebration of Hasbro’s unveiling of a ridiculously huge Metroplex toy, this week’s photos will all be of stuff that’s probably too big for my photography space. 

    We’ll start off tomorrow with the original Metroplex. In the meantime, have some feels.

    Was looking back through some older photos…ha ha, I’m pretty sure I made this one before they actually DID all live together in Metroplex (at least for a little while). 

    Except Rewind.

     

  6. testsubjectb:

    THIS IS NOT A DRILL.
    THE BLUE AND GOLD IS BACK!

    http://www.newsarama.com/22109-blue-beetle-booster-are-back-the-pre-new-52-blue-beetle-booster-gold-are-back.html

    MY HEART

    …I do like the current Blue Beetle, but shooting Ted Kord in the head was maybe one of the dumbest things DC ever did. Also, the fact that these characters seem to exist directly in spite of the New 52 does me well.

     

  7. itswalky:

    Oh hey, lookit all those Recordicons, including stickers based on ones I made!

    (Hrm, apparently their SG Garboil and Howlback are this weird brown color, probably because they’re red but were only seen in blueish nighttime.  They’re the Crimson Sentries, goddammit!) 

    There’s even a Botch in there! Wow!

     

  8. Six-figure challenge: The Fate of the World is Up to These Guys…? edition

    A.K.A. “we’re boned” edition. Lord Dread and Krang serve as the Luthor-Brainiac leadership duo, Skullgrin is the brawn, Mantenna is the scout, Buzzer is the lunatic, and Skito shows up to meetings but is never really sure what he’s doing there. 

    OK that’s all for now. :)

     

  9. Six-figure challenge: Old School Edition

    Also wanted to do this with only vintage figures. Skids is still the leader and Fisto/Grimlock are still the beatsticks, but now Chuckles is the infiltrator, Spy Magician is the distraction, and Mutagen Man is the anti-hero who probably knows Some Dark Secret about the enemy. 

    One more coming. 

     

  10. Here’s my team for d-amazing's 6 figure challenge! 

    The leader is Skids, although he’d probably leave most of the order-barking to Duke. Grimlock and Fisto are the competing muscle, Samus is the infiltrator, and Ga’mede is the anti-hero. 

    (Duke isn’t really my favorite Joe, but I thought he’d look cool with these other figures.)

    I couldn’t resist making a couple more, which will arrive momentarily. 

     

  11. Battle Beasts (Hasbro; 1986)

    For some reason I’ve owned very few of these fantastic little guys. As a kid I had the one that was a purple elephant and the vehicle that was a ram with machine guns on its horns. 

    So I picked up a few of ‘em at a show recently, most without rub signs and all without weapons, just so this line could have some representation in my toy room. 

    My favorite is probably the octopus. 

    (Oh by the way, did you know that these guys were sort of a sub-set of the Transformers line in Japan? They were called “Beastformers” and even appeared in some episodes of The Headmasters.)