1. Anonymous asked: Joes wont ever be as popular as Tformers and Heros.Hasbro tried to make them into spies and secret agents in the 2000s and now into ninja commandos and failed each time.

    But spies, secret agents, and ninja commandos have been present in the line since 1982 and probably earlier…

     


  2. titleknown asked: Speaking on Sci-Fi elements in GI Joe, for that it'd actually make perfect sense to bring back the awesome/unfairly maligned Cobra La, maybe with some defectors to the Joes who want peace with humanity; maybe combining it with Inhumanoids for good measure to boot. Plus, if you've read the awesome Bogleech article on such, you'll know that there's a lot of cool Cobra-La biotech that has yet to be made into toy form.

    Heck yes I’ve read that article, and I’d love to see Cobra-La’s triumphant return. I’d almost wager that with the current return to some of the “gross-out” play patterns of the 1990s they might even be well received. (But not by the Legacy Joe Fans, but you know I just love to see them get pissed off.)

    Cobra-La did actually have a brief revival in “Black Horizon,” one of the Transformers/G.I. Joe crossovers, and that series also featured some of the weirder late-end G1 TF characters. Much love all around.

     


  3. therobotmonster:

    dollsahoy:

    therobotmonster:

    theassortment:

    therobotmonster:

    siphersaysstuff:

    G.I. Joe is pretty well fucked, innit.

    It’s like Greg and I’ve talked about before. Hasbro has had more than a decade of writing on the wall and ignored it. This is the inevitable result.

    No one wants to be reminded that Daddy might not come home from Iraq. Terrorists aren’t the thing of childhood fantasy anymore, they’re the thing of real-world propaganda/fear mongering. And this generation sees Captain American on the big screen, and he’s the normal dude.

    As maligned by fandom as they are, a period of space-adventure or adventure-team-esq schennanigans could have saved Joe. Make the Joes more like MASK, average “joes” brought into amazing circumstances. Keep the colorful, fun and well, awesome Cobra characters (who doesn’t love CC and Destro? Who doesn’t inappropriately love the Baroness?) and give them someone worthy to fight. Make the Joes more like SHIELD, make them superheroes that makes sense in a modern context (they’ve always been super heroes, after all, every single Joe would have to be a genius to have their skill-sets), do something other than recycle 1983-85.

    Joe had two things going for it, one is a play pattern. Well, they’re right fucked now, because the average kid can get Marvel AND DC’s all-star lineups in 3 3/4ths scale, ready and able to drop right into any Star Wars vehicle they have onhand. And the Corps! and others are just lining up to seize the military thing for those that are interested. And cheaper on a by-figure basis too.

    And if a kid’s really die-hard for military stuff, there’s always the X-Box.

    The other was the GI-Joe fantasy… not that the US military could conquer all, but that you could project yourself onto a hero that you could relate to. The Joes were diverse for their time. Now kids have the Ultimate Spider-Man cartoon franchise, the Avengers, the X-Men. Who wants to be Roadblock when you can be Power Man, or Falcon, or Nick Fury? Who wants to be Law when you can be be Nova? Scarlet can’t hold a candle to Black Widow. The superheroes rose up and took that niche. 

    Joe didn’t adapt.

    Maybe in 3-5 years we’ll see a rival. Maybe Joe will eventually get its Beast Wars, it’s new interpretation that eclipses the original and energizes the whole endeavor once more.

    For my part, it’s Cobra I’m going to miss.

    Ok, mostly the Baroness.

    IIRC, G.I. Joe survived through the 1970s because Hasbro gave him a beard and sent him on adventures - if Joe was in the military, he’d be fighting in Vietnam, and that probably wasn’t too fun for kids.

    G.I. Joe survived in Japan in the 1970s because Takara turned him into a cyborg. (You might argue that this isn’t exactly surviving.)

    But yeah, military toys feel like a hard sell right now.

    And it’s worth noting that “A Real American Hero” was originally a SHIELD vs. Hydra concept. Fascinating to think that now, those two entities are probably more well-known to kids than Joe/Cobra.

    Yep, the old “Son of Nick Fury” pitch that had its serial numbers shaved off to become GI-Joe. If you read those first few issues the SHIELD/Hydra roots really show through. 

    And yeah, Joe in the 70s adapted. It found the manly-man adventure zeitgeist of the age and played to that. In Japan, it evolved as well, eventually becoming, by incremental changes, Microman. Which is where most of the general Joe play-pattern is probably going to live on in the near-future. Hasbro got the license for Micronauts and I expect a big push soon.

    And Joe could have survived (and may yet, if they come back to it in a year or two) by adapting into a new concept like it did in the past. But man, the writing has been on the wall for awhile now.

    If I might jump in…  I would argue that AT Joe didn’t quite survive the entirety of the 1970s at all—by 1977 he’d been downsized to the (Mego-mimicking) 8” Super Joe, which lasted into 1978.  True, that doesn’t leave much of the 1970s to have not-survived, but, if not for the unprecedented popularity of Kenner’s 3.75” Star Wars figures, Hasbro might never have recycled revived the GIJoe name. (People who follow me have probably read my previous rants about Hasbro’s history of re-using properties they already own—either by their own creation or by buying the company that did create the property.  And, of course, Hasbro eventually did buy Kenner…and shortly thereafter starting making 12” Joes again…)  ((The caveat about my grumbling here is that I come from the sixthscale action figure side of things, and admit there’s a lot I don’t know about the little guys.))

    That’s true. Of course, the 1970s was the end of an era. Play-pattern driven toys were transitioning into the licensed-figure and character-driven-media-tie-in-franchise concepts that bloomed full in the 1980s and continue on through to today. 

    And lasting from 70-76 without a major reinvention is nothing to sneeze at. A six-year stretch is a decent run in kids’ toys. 

    Most lines now operate on a 3-to-5 year cycle, with line rebranding and reinvention at each turnover. It’s a small selection of traditional brands (Barbie, Hot Wheels, etc.) that don’t follow this pattern.  

    Wow, I totally forgot about Super Joe. I’m not that up on my prior-to-1982 Joe history! The ties with Mego there make my head spinny, especially when you start thinking about how Micronauts and Microman fit into everything.

    Personally, I’d love to see a more sci-fi oriented G.I. Joe line, with super heroes and super science, and maybe some gross monsters, and I’d SUPER love to see the older Joe fans get angry about how their real-ass military figures with laser rifles and ninjas were ruined forever. Super-super love it.

    But I guess the more realistic the military figure, the more uncomfortable they make me. I guess I like wacky 4-color stuff a lot more. That’s why I’m excited for the TF vs. GI Joe comics coming out later this year. And it’s why the more modern parts of my G.I. Joe collection have a very tenuous chance of remaining there forever.

     


  4. therobotmonster:

    siphersaysstuff:

    G.I. Joe is pretty well fucked, innit.

    It’s like Greg and I’ve talked about before. Hasbro has had more than a decade of writing on the wall and ignored it. This is the inevitable result.

    No one wants to be reminded that Daddy might not come home from Iraq. Terrorists aren’t the thing of childhood fantasy anymore, they’re the thing of real-world propaganda/fear mongering. And this generation sees Captain American on the big screen, and he’s the normal dude.

    As maligned by fandom as they are, a period of space-adventure or adventure-team-esq schennanigans could have saved Joe. Make the Joes more like MASK, average “joes” brought into amazing circumstances. Keep the colorful, fun and well, awesome Cobra characters (who doesn’t love CC and Destro? Who doesn’t inappropriately love the Baroness?) and give them someone worthy to fight. Make the Joes more like SHIELD, make them superheroes that makes sense in a modern context (they’ve always been super heroes, after all, every single Joe would have to be a genius to have their skill-sets), do something other than recycle 1983-85.

    Joe had two things going for it, one is a play pattern. Well, they’re right fucked now, because the average kid can get Marvel AND DC’s all-star lineups in 3 3/4ths scale, ready and able to drop right into any Star Wars vehicle they have onhand. And the Corps! and others are just lining up to seize the military thing for those that are interested. And cheaper on a by-figure basis too.

    And if a kid’s really die-hard for military stuff, there’s always the X-Box.

    The other was the GI-Joe fantasy… not that the US military could conquer all, but that you could project yourself onto a hero that you could relate to. The Joes were diverse for their time. Now kids have the Ultimate Spider-Man cartoon franchise, the Avengers, the X-Men. Who wants to be Roadblock when you can be Power Man, or Falcon, or Nick Fury? Who wants to be Law when you can be be Nova? Scarlet can’t hold a candle to Black Widow. The superheroes rose up and took that niche. 

    Joe didn’t adapt.

    Maybe in 3-5 years we’ll see a rival. Maybe Joe will eventually get its Beast Wars, it’s new interpretation that eclipses the original and energizes the whole endeavor once more.

    For my part, it’s Cobra I’m going to miss.

    Ok, mostly the Baroness.

    IIRC, G.I. Joe survived through the 1970s because Hasbro gave him a beard and sent him on adventures - if Joe was in the military, he’d be fighting in Vietnam, and that probably wasn’t too fun for kids.

    G.I. Joe survived in Japan in the 1970s because Takara turned him into a cyborg. (You might argue that this isn’t exactly surviving.)

    But yeah, military toys feel like a hard sell right now.

    And it’s worth noting that “A Real American Hero” was originally a SHIELD vs. Hydra concept. Fascinating to think that now, those two entities are probably more well-known to kids than Joe/Cobra.

     

  5. the-ankle-rocker:

    ryugashadoenix:

    Found it while getting parody pics.

    FAMICOM PRIME!

    Given that I usually blog about Transformers and my previous post was about Famicom…strangely appropriate. Thanks, dashboard!

     

  6. gameandgraphics:

    Famicom “pulse line” cartridge design (1983-1984).

    "In the early days of the Family Computer, Nintendo Co., Ltd. released games with the same label design. Up to that point, Nintendo seemed to think that the best marketing strategy for their games was to keep the labels consistent in design; later on they began producing more creative label designs that varied for each game and often featured characters or scenes from the game." Read more about this at Famicom World.

    Pictures by Bryan Ochalla.

    Some friends threw an 8-bit gaming party a few weeks back and since then my retro gaming fire has been rekindled, and with it my love for the Japanese version of the NES. I only recently learned about the beautiful pulse line carts (in my opinion, superior to the “black box” designs that Nintendo used for its early NES games, which I also love).

    There were 14 games released with this design in 1983. Many of them were later released on the NES, but few are discussed these days - being mostly simple sports games or arcade ports, they were quickly overshadowed the by FC and NES’ vast library of incredible new games.

    So anyway, I’ve made a goal for myself to beat 10 NES/FC games this year that I haven’t previously beaten. So far, I’ve managed to complete Legacy of the Wizard, TMNT II, The Goonies, and Double Dragon II.

     

  7. Terrorcons! Form Abominus! (Transformers; Hasbro; 1987)

    Finishing up Terrorcon week, we have the glorious combined form of the Terrorcons. This dude is a buffet of delicious 80s colors and possibly my favorite Scramble City combiner for that reason alone.

    He has dragon heads for knees.

    Just try not to think about how most of the time his right fist is lodged firmly in Blot’s butt.

     

  8. Beautiful photo taken by Rick Shithouse, a member of the Micronauts/Microman fan group on FB.

     

  9. itswalky:

    arkardo:

    Have we done this one yet?

    hahaha oh no

     

  10. Hun-Grrr (Transformers; Hasbro; 1987)

    The leader of the Terrorcons shares a two-headed dragon mode with his subordinate, Sinnertwin. His deal is that he eats all the time and can regurgitate his half-digested meals as crude missiles. Neat!

    Most of the “Scramble City" style combiner group leaders had a third "base" type mode, usually with the ability to connect to one of the city-bots. Hun-Grrr apparently had such a mode planned, but it was scrapped early on. However, some wacky drawings exist of him configured like in that last pic up there, suggesting how the base mode might have looked.

     

  11. raspberrychainsaw:

    You can’t guard Jordan Suruga

    Haha oh god I’m dying

    (via muhplastic)